My LSA Experience

User avatar
rcigliano
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:07 pm
Contact:

My LSA Experience

Postby rcigliano » Sat Sep 05, 2009 1:59 pm

I posted the following on myTransponder.com.

I have 8.5 hours in an LSA. This is all part of my plan to save money so I can afford to fly. So what have I learned along the way.

First of all, it is FUN!! I have flown the Tecnam P2002 Sierra and the P92 Eaglet. They are both easy to fly and pretty much have the same characteristics. The difference is that the Sierra is a low wing and the Eaglet a high wing.

With the plane being so light, the Tecnams are really sensitive to any wind. These are great crosswind training machines. You really need to put in crosswind correction on take-off and landing.

You need a LOT of right rudder. Again, because of the weight, the P-factor is much stronger. You also need less left rudder. I found I needed right rudder on climb outs while turning left crosswind. You really need it on the take-off roll. Infact, I put in right rudder as I am putting in full power.

Speaking of take-off rolls, they are a blast. You literally do a pop-a-wheely. You keep the nose wheel of the ground and let the plane fly itself off the runway, ala soft-field take-offs.

In cruise they are very stable airplanes. Put in your cruising power, put in trim and they hold altitude very well. Who needs an auto pilot.

You really need to hit the airspeeds and have a stable approach. If you carry any extra power while landing, it will be difficult to get to the 60 kts approach speed and you will float forever or bounce. These puppies love to fly.

I really love the fact that the stall speeds are low and they cruise at a respectable speed. The Eaglet will stall at 39 kts VSo and cruise from 105 to 110 kts. Also, it will land and take-off in less than 1000 feet. This gives you a lot of options. This plane is not a burner in the air but it is comprable to a Cherokee Cruiser at crusie speed and can get in and out of a lot more airports. Did I mention that it burns 4 to 5 gph? All this with a range of 500 to 600 miles. Don't tell me this is not a cruising airplane. It might not get you there as fast as a Diamond DA40 but it will burn half as much gas.

This is also a much cheaper airplane to rent. The cost is comparable to renting a 1970's vintage Cherokee Cruise. This allows me to fly more in a newer airplane with better avionics. Which is a good thing.

Overall, I am very pleased that I chose to get checked out in an LSA. The plane is new (2008), it has a GPS and autopilot, it is usable as a crosscountry machine and it is relatively inexpensive to rent. Also, I believe it will make me a better pilot. The little mistakes that you can get away with in a heavier airplane, you can not in an LSA. You really need to concentrate on crosswind landings and take-offs and hitting the proper airspeeds. Also, the plane I rent does not have an attitude indicator or DG. You need to keep the eyes outside and use the compass. Old time flying.

Anyone looking for a fun plane to fly, save some money and improve their flying skills should check out an LSA. I really believe that they should not be looked as a plane to be used just for Sport Pilot flying. They can and should be used by private pilots. In fact, a friend of mine is finishing up his PPL in an Eaglet to save money.

I will continue to write about my experiences (good and bad) flying an LSA.
Rob
Private Pilot SEL
FRG
Tecnam Eaglet

@RobertCigliano on Twitter
The New Pilot PodBlog Podcast
@NewPilotPodBlog on Twitter
http://thenewpilotpodblog.com

Image

User avatar
PilotBillFromTexas
Posts: 902
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 10:10 am
Location: KGPM Grand Prairie, Texas

Re: My LSA Experience

Postby PilotBillFromTexas » Sat Sep 05, 2009 11:25 pm

rcigliano wrote:I will continue to write about my experiences (good and bad) flying an LSA.


Cool! Please do!

Dave Higdon
Posts: 808
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 1:02 pm

Re: My LSA Experience

Postby Dave Higdon » Sun Sep 06, 2009 2:02 pm

Tip of the wings to you, Rob!! Big time!

Excellent stuff -- and as a guy who moved up from hang gliders and ultralights to the rest of GA, truly appreciate your focus on differences between these LSAs and other mainstream GA airplanes you've flown. Sometimes pilots who started in mainstream GA leave with the impression that they don't fully grasp some of the inherent differences that can come out of lighter wing loadings, geared engines and the like...so your emphasis helps address those traits as just what they are: differences to be learned and dealt with, not problems or shortcomings.

Thanks. Hope you keep it up!

Dave

adamjs
Posts: 23
Joined: Sun Sep 21, 2008 8:29 pm
Location: New York, NY
Contact:

Re: My LSA Experience

Postby adamjs » Sun Sep 06, 2009 10:34 pm

Rob,
Who is operating LSA's on Long Island?
---
Private Pilot ASEL (Complex and High Performance Endorsements)
adamjs on Twitter

User avatar
rcigliano
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:07 pm
Contact:

Re: My LSA Experience

Postby rcigliano » Mon Sep 07, 2009 1:34 am

Dave

Thanks Dave. These are differences and not short comings. These LSAs fit my mission, which right now is flying myself or one passenger on moderate cross-countries. I don't need a speed burner or a plane with long range capabilities. When I do, I will find another plane which will fit my new mission. Plus, I love the low stall and approach speeds and the short landing capabilities. Allows me to fly into a lot more airports than I could flying a DA40.


adamjs - I am renting from Mid Island Air Service at KWV. I believe their FBO at KISP also has some Eaglets. At KHWV, they also offer Sport Pilot training.
http://www.midislandair.com/COMPANY-INF ... rices.html
Rob
Private Pilot SEL
FRG
Tecnam Eaglet

@RobertCigliano on Twitter
The New Pilot PodBlog Podcast
@NewPilotPodBlog on Twitter
http://thenewpilotpodblog.com

Image


Return to “Light Sport Aviation/Sport Pilot”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests